Unfinished Business

I should have covered this a year ago, but unforeseen circumstances (I will spare you the details) prevented me from  sampling Budweiser Black Crown Lager until yesterday.
Now I had to share some grief with the so-called craft beer community a few years ago, when my honest reaction to the ill-fated Budweiser American Ale was that it was a respectable brew. Funny how all this became a problem for those who could not fathom the idea that a mega-brewery could entertain the thought of making a beer  based upon taste. But this was before the Goose Island Beer Co. became a wholly owned subsidiary of AB InBev and the faux craft beers of Blue Moon and Shock Top have advertisements on baseball fields.
There are some funny notions about what beer actually is. Leave it to the idiocy of craft beer associations to decide who is crafty and who is not. As the late movie director John Cassavetes once said: “First we got to play games, then we got to keep score.”
Artisan Brewing is a much better term, but I sense that seems too sophisticated, in an ever expanding market where breweries attempt to distinguish themselves from each other. Meanwhile, the people who are not into studying beer, buy their beer oblivious to who owns it or which millionaire it makes happy.
Once upon a time, in a brew galaxy not far away, good beer was found only on draft or in glass bottles. But this was before the craft can revolution (a term that makes me laugh to this day). Funny how the price of the beer remains the same as its bottled brethren, despite the reduced shipping weight. You might ask a craft can enthusiast if they know the difference between a Ball or Rexam can?
Then there is the marketing business about alcohol which can best be described  as a get more bang for your bucks, which is what AB InBev emphasizes with Budweiser Black Crown 6.0% ALC./VOL. on the neck of the bottle. The same more hootch approach used by Budweiser Platinum and Beck’s Sapphire. But the term Black Crown is a curious term for a golden amber lager.
Which brings me to the actual sampling. I found this to be remarkably drinkable beer. The caramel malts provide plenty of support for a base that is pleasure to drink. Enough said.

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