Tag Archives: marketing

The Very Long Trail Of Beer Adventures

Editor’s note: The never ending search for good tasting beer goes way back. In my case, the quest to find flavorful beer goes all the way back to the second half of the 1970’s (at least legally) when domestic beer was essentially lager brewed with rice and/or corn, which in the case of Schlitz, the disastrous use of anti-foaming agents made Budweiser the king of American beers.
In those days, with the delightful exception of spring American bock, flavorful beer was found in imported beer, although obtaining fresh examples from Europe was dubious at best.

Carlsberg then and now

Carlsberg brewery which often gets pooh-poohed from the beer expert crowd. Is now doing collaborative with Brooklyn Brewery. Long before its recognition as a global futbol brand 1960s-advert-magazine-advertisement-dated-1968-advertising-carlsberg-f0ey8y Carlsberg had a special place in American beer history, with its introduction of beer_712Carlsberg Elephant malt liquor (as it was called, addressing taxation concerns) was an early example of strong beer, although by today’s standard of strength, would be considered somewhat mild. But in those days, most beer was weak and watery. The Elephant, as it was commonly referred to, was in a class by itself. It was a beer my lost friend TA said he would serve to Hunter S. Thompson.

Before It was called fresh hop IPA

sierra_nevada_celebration_ale Sierra Nevada beers were rare anywhere east of the Mississippi river. When Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale first appeared in the Midwest, there was no reference of it being an IPA. It was just an extraordinary tasting ale. This was before hops became marketing drudgery.

Great tasting beer existed before anyone had the idea of saying the word “craft”

augbockThe fabulous recipe from Huber Brewing in Monroe, Wisconsin was a prime example of the Augsburger brand and their commitment to the German bock tradition. Education was sparse, to say the least, concerning beer in those days, with many folks still believing that bock was created by cleaning out the vats. Augsburger countered this misinformation by printing up a bock marker explaining the Einbeck roots of the style, placed inside each six pack.

Imported, no Transported to Another World

8340cbd9af6b4cca389d11b01200c0a8

I recall my friend Gary, who in those days was strictly a Bud man, preferring the can to the bottle. He had a nice deli sandwich he was about to eat and he poured the weissbier into a ceramic mug. He took a healthy quaff and developed a new found expression on his face. One I had never seen before: a moment of surprised delight. Can one beer experience change your reality? Well all I can say that Gary, the hard working Bud man, 10 years later was ordering for Christmas, a half barrel of August Schell Cherry Bock, their holiday Blizzard/Snow Storm recipe that year.
Prost!

Advertisements

Goodbye To All Of This

A recent event has caused me to reevaluate whether or not I should continue this blog. But before I get to this, I would like to thank all the people who have helped me in my educational path in the world of beer. Most of these encounters occurred long ago, but that does not mean I have forgotten their contributions. This was back in a time of magical beer thinking and writing, when there was actual poetry in describing the world’s great beers. That was before the technologically driven market place raised the concept of American exceptionalism to the point that the latest upstart breweries are bold in their marketing chutzpah:

WE DON’T BREW BEER FOR THE MASSES. INSTEAD, OUR BEERS ARE CRAFTED FOR A CHOSEN FEW, A SMALL CADRE OF RENEGADES AND REBELS WHO ENJOY BEER THAT PUSHES THE LIMITS OF WHAT IS COMMONLY ACCEPTED AS TASTE. IN SHORT. WE BREW FOR PEOPLE LIKE US. FOUNDERS. BREWED FOR US.

Well I do not know about you dear reader, but I certainly do not consider myself a part of that small cadre of the chosen few, although I have enjoyed Founders Dirty Bastard Ale, but after sampling their absolutely wretched PC Pils index a beer that actually made me ill. The first day I tried 1 bottle after a long hot day working outside. About 10 minutes later felt nauseous, so I thought maybe it’s heat exhaustion so I went to bed with an upset stomach, and thought nothing else about it.
The next day, same scenario, but with only a have day outside and an early morning breakfast, and the exact same thing happened. I was forced to throw out the rest of the six-pack and as a poor person (according to Founders, that must mean I am one of those “masses” that they do not brew for) that $10 plus tax does not sit well with me. But as the Beer Doctor, I always assumed that buying bad beer, or simply beers I do not like, was part of the material costs of the continuing project. But the arrogance associated with this horrible brew, went beyond all decency for me.
Calling this beer American hopped pilsner is a cruel joke for someone seeking the comfort of the malt forward style accentuated by floral hops. This is just an India Pale Lager of the worst kind. It made me wonder if perhaps those bold American hops of Chinook. Cascade. and Centennial where sprayed with pesticides? All I really know is this beer made me sick.

For those who have grown up learning about beer from the Internet, most of the information posted on web sites such as Beer Advocate or Rate Beer are basically useless, because there is an entire cadre of beer fans who offer their opinions with no idea of what they are talking about. Back that up with belligerent bullshit from the aggressive new breweries on the block, and you have a rising mountain of disinformation, which makes you believe that the latest US barrel aged sour is better than Rodenbach Grand Cru.

Then of course there is that neoliberal wet dream known as the Brewers Association, who seem to evolve along the lines of the Democratic National Committee. First, by expanding how many millions of barrels of beer you are allowed to brew and still be designated with that most holy term of craft. Then there is the thought police aspect of this virtuous group who have decided to clean up their industry of what they deem to be offensive labels. This prompted Flying Dog Brewery to say, thanks but no thanks, and bye bye.
The recent BA decision to produce an independently brewed designation on labels, it is said to be designed to differentiate from Big Brewer takeover of craft brewed brands. Well, this seems like pissing into the wind, because after all, those masses are not part of their audience anyway, that is mostly white, affluent and exceptionally American. How else to explain why Dogfish Head takes pride in the fact that their beers sell for over $50 a case?

Beer at one time was the drink of the common people. Who were the common people? Those who were not a part of the Ownership Class. The people who had to have session beer so they could continue their long shifts in armament factories in England in World War I. Beer provided respite from the often brutal ordeals of everyday living. In that sense, big beer productions is still doing that ihamms but is often overlooked by the racist snobbery of those in the industry who think it would be fun to make a faux tribute to malt liquor. To be sure, I lived under that delusional nonsense that tells me I should be concerned about where my precious money goes. In other words: who are the cool millionaires?
Globalism is not just for shoes and clothing. Beer is right there in the mix. Ask the people in the continent of Australia how they feel about AB-I taking over Carlton United ownership? How does Cooper & Sons play into all of this?

Here in the United States, we have the altruistic craft breweries, who do the neoliberal right thing  of donating to charities they deem worthy, or creating projects such as teaching incarcerated women how to repair bicycles.
The spirit of inventiveness abounds. I have a brewer in my own neighborhood who is creating an ale that mimics a famous local dill pickle.
Oh lord get me out of here! Goodbye to all of this.

The Two Kinds Of Beer

It was John Keeling of Fuller’s Brewery who said it best:

“To me there is only two kinds of beer. Beers I like and beers I don’t.”

Which sums up how I feel about the brewing industry after many decades of research. All those marketing terms about craft and can craft and all the double talk about beers being inferior because of adjunct grains, and then remarkably become outstanding when a hip brewery makes a stab at a Mexican lager.
Then of course there is the ridiculously stupid statement from Dogfish Head’s Sam Calagione who said rheinheitsgebot was a centuries old art censorship law. No Mr. Sam, it was a food purity law where pork scraps were not considered to be worthy of beer production. But all of that concern for pure ingredients is behind us now, in the globalist tradition where Goose Island products can be purchased on the continent of Australia.

As far as I know, no one calls London’s Fuller’s Brewery a craft brewery, but the 172 year old brewery makes some of the finest brew in the world, in my ancient opinion. Their ESB, London Pride and 1845, I hold in highest regard. These are venerable go to beers… if you are lucky enough to find them.

When Alaska Finally came around.alaska alt

For nearly a decade, the only contact I had with the Alaska Brewing Company in Juneau Alaska was being on their e-mail list where I read of merchandise and new productions to their portfolio. For quite awhile Alaska Brewing beers were only available on parts of the west coast. So like a thirsty beer gorilla I look through the bars of my logistical cage, wondering what their rauchbier Smoked Porter actually tasted like. Then recently I saw a reasonably priced 12 pack of their Amber Alt Ale ($16, tax included) which was and is a can beer I have been waiting for. Unlike many flagship ambers, that are usually variations on Vienna lager, Alaska Amber is the old ale style usually associated with the Westphalia region of Germany. Top fermented at a cooler temperature, the recipe is an adaptation from The Douglas City Brewing Company of over 100 years ago, when thirsty miners needed a beer with substance.

One of the best local beers is marketed as a baseball season novelty.

I can not express how much I have enjoyed the Braxton Brewery’s 1957 All Star Ale1957-Can-300x270Their wonderful take on an English mild. A limited specialty release, which is sad, because this is a great recipe that I would love to see brewed throughout the year. The baseball marketing with the Crosley field cracker jack analogy simply gets in the way.

Now to a beer I do not care for. pacer
Christian Moerlein Pacer Pale Ale is a Citra dry hopped ale designed to accentuate the fruit characteristic of this hop. It is well done, but as John Keeling reminded me, it is a beer I have no desire to drink again.
Again thank you, from an ancient taster.
The Beer Doctor